Inside the house. November 2019, Bnei Brak
Bnei Brak est une ville en bordure de Tel Aviv qui concentre la plus grande communauté de juifs ultra-orthodoxes au monde. Une partie de ma famille y réside et j’ai suivi leur quotidien sur plusieurs mois. Habiter dans cette ville c’est faire le choix de se distinguer, voir de se séparer d’une autre réalité, laïque, se déroulant à quelques kilomètres de là.
J’ai circulé entre les personnes et les espaces qui contiennent et séparent la vie religieuse du reste. En tournant à l’intérieur et à l’extérieur de la ville, j’ai vu se dérouler de multiples frontières qui composent une société fragmentée, divisée, parfois morcelée, à l’image d’Israël.


The Veil is a photo project in progress that deals with Bnei Brak, Israel, where my ultra orthodox jewish family is living. Also called Haredim (the one that fear God), this small city concentrates the major part of them. This community defines itself through a strong attachment to the multiple laws found in the Torah. Bnei Brak also rejects every social and technological innovation (no internet, no access to television, very few smartphones). Besides, this will to assume its marginality, the city faces Tel Aviv, known for its crowded bar and parties where tourist from all around the world meet. Through a series of pictures I took of young people living in Tel Aviv & Bnei Brak I wanted to question the israelian society ruled by an important series of laws, in both side. 

In Bnei Brak, their roles is to limit the access to this liberal reality but also to control the transition to teenagehood. A series of transformations that take place in interiors, bedrooms, living rooms, in a familial intimity which is looking to contain this metamorphosis while she witnesses it. They pictures a house that never change while veils, depicting walls hide bodies and faces in transformation.

The pictures presented here evoke this state between childhood and adulthood as well as my position between two cities, two frontiers and a series of walls that defines in itself Israelian society.



Yehudit.
December 2019, Bnei Brak.



Covered Legs. November 2019, Bnei Brak.

Curtains.
December 2019, Jericho.


Scout playing in the Park.
September 2019, Tel Aviv.







Playing.
December 2019, Bnei Brak




Buildings.
January 2020, Bnei Brak

Les yeux fermés.
January 2020, Bnei Brak







Wall of separation between Bnei Brak & Tel Aviv. 
November 2019, Tel Aviv


















































Tsipora & the Chophar.
November 2019, Bnei Brak




Hannoukia.
January 2020, Jerusalem

Tsipora.
November 2019, Bnei Brak









Girls in the Park. 
September 2019, Tel Aviv

















Window.
December 2019, Bnei Brak.
Tsipora at the end of the day.
December 2019, Bnei Brak

Hava Malka behind the curtains.
November 2019, Bnei Brak








Girl from Tel Aviv playing with the sand.
December 2019, Tel Aviv
Looking through.
December 2019, Bnei Brak

Living room.
December 2019, Bnei Brak
Religious shop.
January 2020, Jerusalem.


Sukkah.
December 2019, Bnei Brak





Refugee camp.
December 2019, Ramallah

Young girls building their own sukkah.
December 2019, Tel Aviv











Wall between Bnei Brak & Tel Aviv.
November 2019, Bnei Brak
Tsipora at the end of the day.
November 2019, Bnei Brak







Young girls from Bnei Brak playing in the park. November 2019, Tel Aviv






Girl celebrating her birthday. 
November 2019, Tel Aviv

Homework.
November 2019, Bnei Brak

Batcheva playing.
November 2019, Bnei Brak

Inside the sukkah.
September 2019, Bnei Brak










Hava Malka in the sukkah.
September 2019, Bnei Bra












Collages.
September 2019, Bnei Brak

Hava Malka in the sukkah.
September 2019, Bnei Brak

On my way to Bnei Brak.
November 2019, Tel Aviv
Parking in front of Bnei Brak.
November 2019, Tel Aviv

Batcheva at the end of the day.
October 2019, Bnei Brak.
A military waiting at the Central Bus Station. December 2019, Tel Aviv.







Abandonned sukkah.
October 2019, Tel Aviv
Mark